Top 10 Best All-Season Truck Tires: Recommend & Reviews

When choosing tires for your pickup truck, you essentially have two choices: all-terrain (A/T) tires or all-season highway tires (H/T). Don’t get us wrong since A/T tires are also classified as ‘all-season’ unless talking about dedicated snow tires. Each type serves a different purpose, and the best tire for your truck depends on your driving habits.

In this article, we compiled a list of the best all-season H/T truck tires. If you’re looking for the best all-terrain tires, we tackled that in our previous list of the best A/T truck tires. We started with the top brands and included a shortlist of cheaper alternatives.

What’s the difference between all-season and all-terrain tires?

Don’t be misled. With the exemption of summer and snow tires, all tires are marketed as all-season tires, including A/T and mud tires. In this day and age of hybrid tires, the fine line between an H/T and a rugged A/T tire is hard to define. We guess the better question to ask is: What’s the difference between an H/T and A/T tire?

Highway tires (H/T) have smaller tread blocks and narrower voids between each block, which is pretty similar to a standard touring tire for cars and sedans. Highway tires are mostly engineered to deliver a smooth and comfortable ride with longer wear – again, pretty similar to a touring tire. But the best all-season H/T truck tires are built to withstand the added weight of your truck and are tougher and more durable than ordinary tires.

On the other hand, all-terrain (A/T) tires have larger tread blocks. You’ll also notice bigger and wider voids between each block. The treads are also equipped with additional siping and stepped edges to offer more grip over slippery or loose surfaces.  A/T tires are engineered to grip over dirt, snow, mud, loose gravel, sand, and grass. Without a doubt, A/T tires are more rugged than H/T tires.

The Best All-Season Truck Tires

Michelin LTX M/S2

Michelin LTX M/S2

Leading our list of best all-season truck tires is the Michelin LTX M/S2. This is a true highway tire for all-season driving. Constructed from a hard-wearing silica-enriched rubber compound, the LTX M/S2 offers longer wear and a comfortable ride. Equipped with a symmetric tread design utilizing Michelin’s MaxTouch Construction technology, this tire offers a solid contact patch to deliver reliable traction, sportier handling, and better high-speed stability.

The Michelin LTX M/S2 is comprised of independent tread blocks with high-density 3D active sipes. The tire also comes with four circumferential channels and multiple lateral grooves to immediately evacuate water, slush, mud, and snow from the contact patch.

This tire performs admirably in both dry and wet roads. It’s also as comfortable as a genuine touring tire and rides silently over coarse asphalt. But since the Michelin LTX M/S2 is oriented more towards highway comfort, there are small compromises. It’s only average on dirt roads, and it’s not exactly great over snowy or icy roads. But as an all-season highway tire, the Michelin LTX M/S2 is as good as it gets.

Pros

  • Superior long-distance comfort
  • Silent ride
  • All-season traction and grip
  • Longer wear

Cons

  • Average on snowy roads
  • Not ideal for off-road driving
  • Higher price

Goodyear Wrangler Fortitude HT

Goodyear Wrangler Fortitude HT

The Goodyear Wrangler Fortitude HT rightfully deserves a place in our list of best all-season truck tires, if not a bit pricey. This is a true highway tire with a bit of ruggedness built-in. Admittedly, it doesn’t shine on dirt roads, but it’s a magnificent performer on smooth tarmac. It’s also one of the most comfortable H/T tires for trucks.

Goodyear utilized a premium low rolling resistance rubber compound for the Wrangler Fortitude HT. This enables the tire to deliver better fuel economy without compromising ride comfort, handling, and all-season traction. It has a symmetrical tread design with aggressive shoulder blocks and intermediate blocks – crucial ingredients for better handling and steering response.

The tire also has a continuous center rib and wide circumferential grooves to expel water, moisture, and dirt from the contact patch. Although more expensive than the Michelin, the Goodyear Wrangler Fortitude HT manages to impress in terms of highway comfort and tread wear.

Pros

  • All-season traction
  • Comfortable and quiet ride
  • Longer wear
  • Sportier handling

Cons

  • Not great on snowy roads
  • Average off-road performance
  • It’s a bit pricey

Continental TerrainContact H/T

Continental TerrainContact H/T

The Continental TerrainContact H/T is clearly a hybrid H/T and off-road tire. It has less aggressive tread blocks like an H/T tire, but it’s also available with outlined white letters on the sidewall like a rugged A/T tire. True to form, it’s more capable off-road than other H/T tires, but it manages to deliver longer wear and a comfy ride on the highway.

The tire is equipped with a symmetric tread pattern molded from a robust tread compound infused with Continental’s Silane+ additives. The shoulders have large and stable blocks to offer better traction and surefooted handling on dry and wet pavement. Meanwhile, there are noise blockers between each block to cancel out road noise. Also, the tread design is computer-optimized to roll silently over coarse asphalt.

The Continental TerrainContact H/T has full-depth interlocking sipes and additional traction grooves to offer stable grip over snowy, wet, or icy roads. Best of all, Continental is offering the TerrainContact H/T at a lower price than both the Michelin and Goodyear.

Pros

  • Admirable highway performance
  • Great for mild off-roading
  • Offers better grip on snowy or wet pavement
  • Comfortable and silent ride
  • Sporty handling
  • Longer wear
  • Nice price

Cons

  • Not much

Pirelli Scorpion STR A

Pirelli Scorpion STR A

Similar to the Continental, Pirelli’s Scorpion STR A is a multifaceted highway tire. It’s rugged enough to handle a bit of off-roading, and it’s grippy enough to forge over wet and slippery roads. The Scorpion STR A is Pirelli’s premier all-season highway tire for light trucks, large crossovers, and sport-utility vehicles. The tire is available in two different symmetric tread patterns according to the region: The North American market is identifiable as the Scorpion STR A while the European market receives the Scorpion STR.

The Scorpion STR A is equipped with a symmetrical tread pattern with independent tread blocks, narrow grooves, and continuous shoulder ribs. The overall tread pattern is designed for longer wear and a quieter, smoother ride. In our tests, the Pirelli Scorpion STR A is one of the most comfortable H/T tire for trucks. It’s also among the most silent despite having a more rugged tread design.

Pros

  • All-season traction
  • Sporty handling
  • Excellent high-speed stability
  • Quiet and comfy ride

Cons

  • Average on snowy roads
  • Average off-road performance

Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus

Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus

The Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus is one of the most popular all-season tires for light trucks, crossovers, and SUVs. This tire is engineered to deliver longer wear, better fuel economy, and steady traction in all-season driving, including light snow. However, this is not a dedicated A/T tire, so don’t expect rugged performance in winter driving. But on the highway, this tire will literally shine.

The tread blocks are fine-tuned to offer a comfortable and silent ride. Equipped with notched shoulder blocks, wider circumferential grooves, and a continuous center rib, the Bridgestone Dueler H/L Alenza Plus delivers better handling and a more stable ride. The treads are equipped with variable siping and lateral notches to improve traction over snowy, slippery, or loose pavement.

Pros

  • Silent and comfortable ride
  • All-season and all-weather traction
  • Sporty handling
  • Better high-speed stability
  • Higher than average off-road performance
  • Affordable price
  • Longer wear

Cons

  • Not much

Michelin Agilis CrossClimate

Michelin Agilis CrossClimate

All it takes is a short glance to discern the Michelin Agilis CrossClimate is a more rugged all-season H/T tire. In fact, this tire is engineered for work trucks in rough conditions. Also, it’s one of a few all-season H/T tires branded with the three-peak mountain snowflake symbol (3PMSF). This tire is available with a symmetric tread pattern for LT-metric sizes while Euro versions receive a directional tread pattern.

Whatever the case, the Agilis CrossClimate is equipped with longer and wider tread blocks courtesy of Michelin’s StabiliBlok technology. The purpose behind this is to offer a rough and ready tire that withstands heavy loads and inclement weather conditions. The tread blocks are festooned with numerous biting edges to deliver a stable grip on any type of road, whether dry, wet, snowy, or muddy.

The tire also has deeper lateral grooves with open shoulder blocks to provide excellent hydroplaning resistance. Meanwhile, independent tread blocks are responsible for the tire’s admirable performance over snowy or icy roads. The Michelin Agilis CrossClimate is the perfect tire for work trucks if not for the price. It’s one of the most expensive in this list, but it’s the only all-season tire rated for severe snow conditions.

Pros

  • Outstanding durability and toughness
  • Great for snowy roads
  • All-season traction and grip
  • Good handling
  • Excellent performance on wet roads
  • Comfortable ride

Cons

  • Louder tire noise
  • Expensive price

Pirelli Scorpion Verde All Season Plus II

Pirelli Scorpion Verde All Season Plus II

The Pirelli Scorpion Verde All Season Plus II is another one of our favorite all-season truck tires. It’s actually a hybrid H/T tire that offers confident traction in mild off-roading, including snowy, muddy, or grassy pavement. The Scorpion Verde All Season Plus II is constructed from an updated tread compound to offer better grip over wet, icy, slippery, and snowy roads.

This tire is equipped with a sportier asymmetrical tread pattern with an optimized rubber-to-void ratio. The tread blocks are optimized and tuned for a smoother and quieter ride without penalizing ride comfort and tire wear. It also has a larger footprint than most H/T tires which equates to sharper handling, accurate steering, and sure-footed grip in changing weather conditions.

The Pirelli Scorpion Verde All Season Plus II also comes with four circumferential grooves and high-density lateral siping to enhance wet traction. It may be pricier than other all-season tires, but it’s definitely one of the best for light trucks and SUVs.

Pros

  • All-weather grip
  • Admirable performance on snowy roads
  • Comfortable and silent ride
  • Sharper handling
  • Better fuel economy
  • Good for mild off-roading

Cons

  • Higher price

BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport LT

BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport LT

The BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport LT is rightfully included in our list of best all-season tires for trucks, and for a good reason. It perfectly blends fine highway manners with just the right amount of ruggedness to handle inclement weather and rough pavement. It’s one of the highest-rated all-season tires for light trucks, and it also comes at an affordable price.

This tire is also branded with the three-peak mountain snowflake symbol (3PMSF). This means you get an excellent highway tire with the all-conquering merits of an all-terrain tire. It starts with a highly-advanced all-season tread compound with 3D Active Sipe Technology. Equipped with a full-depth symmetrical tread design, the optimized tire footprint delivers better handling and stronger braking in the wet.

The BFGoodrich Advantage T/A Sport LT has everything you need in an all-season truck tire, and more. And despite having a tougher and sportier demeanor, it manages to remain comfortable and silent on the highway. Also, the treadwear is worth mentioning since this tire is destined for longer service life.

Pros

  • All-season and all-weather traction
  • Sporty handling and sharper steering
  • Quiet and comfortable ride
  • Longer treadwear
  • Outstanding over snow, ice, and wet roads
  • Affordable price

Cons

  • Not much

Cooper Discoverer HT3

Cooper Discoverer HT3

The Cooper Discoverer is the wildcard in this list of best all-season truck tires. At first glance, it may have a more rugged design, but this tire excels mostly over paved highways. It does offer moderate off-road performance, but it’s not intended for deep snow or winter driving.

But on tarmac, this tire delivers the goods despite the affordable price. Constructed using a high-silica tread compound, the commercial-based symmetrical design provides a tough, go-anywhere attitude. It has a basic symmetrical tread pattern with continuous shoulder ribs and interlocking 3D micro-gauge sipes. The overall tread design is meant to improve handling, stability, braking, and responsiveness on dry and wet pavement.

In our testing, the Cooper Discoverer HT3 is an excellent performer in the dry, but it also surpassed our expectations over wet and slippery tarmac. It’s not as good over deep snow, but it still offers acceptable performance in mild off-roading.  Again, this is mightily impressive given it delivers high levels of comfort and road silence.

Pros

  • All-season traction
  • All-weather grip
  • Comfortable and quiet on tarmac
  • Good for mild off-roading
  • Stable handling
  • Good price

Cons

  • Faster wear
  • Not ideal for snowy roads

The Best and Most Affordable All-Season Truck Tires

Yokohama Geolandar H/T G056

Yokohama Geolandar H/T G056

The Yokohama Geolandar H/T G056 fuses the rugged looks of an all-terrain, all-season tire with the refinement of a touring tire. Constructed from a unique all-season compound infused with Orange Oil technology and micro-silica, this tire blends a comfy ride and longer wear with year-round traction and grip.

It has a symmetric tread design with adaptive shoulder blocks. The latter forms a continuous shoulder rib to promote even wear while reducing tire roar. The Yokohama Geolandar H/T G056 is also equipped with triple 3D sipes and independent center blocks to offer sportier handling and better traction over wet and slippery roads.

Starting at around $150 each, the Yokohama Geolandar H/T G056 is an affordable all-season truck tire with the performance merits of an expensive tire.

Pros

  • Excellent all-weather traction
  • Quiet and comfortable ride
  • Stable handling and better responsiveness
  • Affordable price
  • Rugged styling

Cons

  • Average off-road performance
  • Not ideal for snowy roads

Firestone Destination LE3

Firestone Destination LE3

Starting at less than $150 each, the Firestone Destination LE3 is an excellent choice for an all-season truck tire. Mainly designed to offer a comfortable and quiet highway ride, the newest Destination LE3 is well-equipped for mild off-roading.

Mind you, the Firestone Destination LE3 is not a hardcore all-terrain tire, but it manages to offer decent levels of traction over dirt roads, sand, and even light snow. It has a symmetric tread design with full-depth treads and an optimized tread pattern. Utilizing Firestone’s Hydro-Grip technology, this tire is designed to literally slice over wet and slippery roads. The tread face is equipped with a bevy of full-depth 3D sipes to deliver the necessary clawing action when traversing harsh terrain.

But most of all, this tire excels on smooth tarmac. It rides silently like a more expensive tire, and the treads are engineered for longer wear.

Pros

  • Sporty symmetric tread design
  • All-season grip
  • Sporty handling
  • Excellent over wet and slippery pavement
  • Good for mild off-roading
  • Affordable price
  • Longer wear

Cons

  • Bumpier ride

Kumho Crugen HT51

Kumho Crugen HT51 - 1

Are you looking for an all-terrain tire that outperforms the leading brands? Take a closer look at the Kumho Crugen HT51. Constructed using an all-season tread compound molded into a sportier asymmetrical tread design, the Kumho Crugen HT51 deserves to be taken seriously despite its affordable price. It has an optimized geometric block layout for a comfier ride with longer wear. And with a five-rib tread design and a stiff center block, it offers sharper handling, better stability, and enhanced traction in changing weather conditions.

As if that’s not enough, the Kumho Crugen HT51 is branded with the three-peak mountain snowflake symbol (3PMSF). What this means is a comfy all-season tire that performs admirably in the snow. But what really makes this tire shine is the on-road comfort. True to form, it rolls like a touring tire and lasts longer, too.

Pros

  • Excellent all-weather traction
  • Admirable over snowy roads
  • Quiet and comfortable on the highway
  • Good for mild off-roading
  • Longer wear
  • Affordable price

Cons

  • Not much

Sumitomo Encounter HT

Sumitomo Encounter HT

If you want a low-priced all-season truck tire with almost zero compromises, feast your eyes on the Sumitomo Encounter HT. It may look plain, but Sumitomo optimized this tire to offer the best of both worlds: Premium highway performance and moderate all-season traction. Starting at less than $140 each, this tire is one of the cheapest and most highly-capable truck tires we ever tested.

The tire is constructed using an all-season rubber compound with a symmetrical tread pattern. It has independent shoulder blocks and intermediate blocks to offer better handling while zigzag lateral sipes deliver better traction on wet, slippery, and snowy pavement.

But the thing that impresses the most about Sumitomo’s Encounter HT is the comfortable ride. It manages to roll silently and smoothly over coarse asphalt. Also, the wear characteristics are worth the price. This tire is hard to ignore.

Pros

  • All-weather grip
  • Comfortable and quiet ride
  • Longer wear
  • Ideal for mild off-roading
  • Nice price

Cons

  • Mediocre snow performance

General Grabber HTS 60

General Tire Grabber HTS 60

First off, the General Grabber HTS 60 is probably the costliest among the cheaper tires in this list. But for the money, you get rugged styling with the refinement of a touring tire. And if the white outlined letters on the sidewall are any indication, the General Grabber HTS 60 has the smarts to conquer rougher patches of pavement.

General utilized a chip-resistant tread compound for the Grabber HTS 60. This type of rubber compound is usually reserved for all-terrain tires. And with that, the Grabber HTS 60 is as tough as it gets. It has a continuous center rib with independent tread blocks to offer better stability and sharper handling. And with standard sound barrier ribs and notched shoulders, it also rolls silently and quietly over smooth tarmac.

For the price, the General Grabber HTS 60 is ideal for mild off-road applications including light snow. But despite its rugged countenance, it manages to perform like a touring tire on smooth highways.

Pros

  • Rugged design
  • Premium comfort
  • Silent ride
  • Longer wear
  • Ideal for mild off-roading
  • Sharper handling

Cons

  • Not much

Conclusion

The best all-season highway tires for trucks are those that deliver lasting touring comfort, a quiet ride, and longer wear. But with the proliferation of hybrid tires, H/T tires are capable of blending premium comfort with advanced ruggedness.

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